Licensed from @5byseven at Twenty20.com.

While we fret about transgender girls in sports and rig up a billion-dollar industry to indoctrinate our corporate and government workers with critical race theory, around us the world keeps turning.

The way the world ends, T.S. Eliot reminds us, is “Not with a bang but a whimper.” But our country’s seeming slide into the abyss is starting to feel like a roller coaster ride, if not one where the passengers end up safely back at the loading station.

As most readers will know, a few weeks back a Chinese diplomat cleaned Secretary of State Anthony Blinken’s clock during the…


Licensed from @digitalshape at Twenty20.com.

Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic are the academy’s equivalent to the single-issue voter: too narrow-minded to see the bigger picture and too self-centered to put themselves in somebody else’s shoes.

Why is it that the Woke aimed to reduce six works of Dr. Seuss, known primarily as the author and illustrator of an enormous number of wonderfully whimsical and educational children’s books, to toxic contraband due to alleged racism within these stories, written three quarters of a century ago?

After all, the man was a noted Democrat and staunch supporter of FDR’s efforts to bring the United States into World…


Licensed from Richard Lawrence at Twenty20.com.

A civilization which forgets or rewrites its unique past is a civilization doomed to succumb to the centrifugal forces cranked up by the extremists within its ranks.

Reading about Antifa, its modi operandi, its motives, and its insidious influences on our Western societies has been a long-time pre-occupation of yours truly. Growing up in Western Europe there was never any shortage of developments surrounding this topic. But, notwithstanding its dangers back there and then, Antifa’s European activities at the time couldn’t hold a candle to what happened in the United States in 2020.

Journalist Andy Ngo, a native of Portland…


A crowd protesting with a sign held up saying “Racism will not be tolerated”.
Licensed from @5bySeven at Twenty20.com.

Whatever problems we are facing, they require a course correction at most, not for us to dismantle the entire ship.

Rumors of an incident in my hometown spread like a wildfire this week. Someone came out on social media with a story from a black friend who claimed that she was (or was almost) denied service at an appliance repair shop. While no further details were provided, much less a reason for the alleged (non-)refusal, the assumption was that the color of the customer’s skin had something to do with it.

Within days the usual suspects were at it on…


Yesterday’s events were mostly the doing of a president who, in defeat, proved unable to contain his base impulses.

Let’s get the following three disclaimers out of the way.

#1: Yours truly would have crawled over broken glass to vote for Donald Trump in November twenty-five times had the law permitted it. If the clock could be dialed back two months, I’d do it all over again, and the barrel of a gun on my temple couldn’t persuade me to vote for Joe Biden instead.

I’m surrounded by those considered to be part of the Trump “base”, many of whom have truly gotten the shaft in our globalized economy and deserve our sympathy. Twenty years ago they might have…


Licensed from @mylove4art at Twenty20.com.

Trumpism wasn’t defeated on Tuesday. It was locked up in a pressure cooker put on its highest setting.

This much is clear: Progressives expecting a blue landslide on Tuesday have been proven utterly wrong. With the count still ongoing five days later, it’s looking like 48% of voters backed President Trump’s re-election bid.

The close margins in this election are as extraordinary as they are impressive on Trump’s part. Like four years ago, the polls heavily underestimated enthusiasm for the president. As of this writing the race will soon be called for Joe Biden by the powers that be, though…


Licensed from Pamela’s Photo Poetry on Twenty20.com.

An existential angst has taken hold of America. It’s come in the form of a realization that our constitutional republic may be slipping through our fingers. This anxiety seems to be the one point of bipartisan agreement in our otherwise hopelessly divided body politic. But when it comes to assigning blame for the erosion of our institutions, conservatives and progressives revert right back to pointing fingers at one another.

To find out whether there is any merit to this societal angst, and if so, which side is to blame for the supposed oncoming collapse, we have to steer clear from…


Licensed from DJ Akisanya on Twenty20.com.

Justice Ginsburg’s unfortunately timed death serves as another depressing reminder how despicably polarized our body politic has become. In a period of just four hours it became obvious that few, if any, are even concerned with the Justice’s legacy anymore. Instead, the focus was immediately shifted to the seat she left vacant on the Supreme Court, with Senate leaders Mitch McConnell and Chuck Schumer each digging in their heels over the question whether the nomination and confirmation of her replacement should take place before or after the election.

So quickly was the temperature turned up that religious ‘scholar’ and TV…


Andrew Kuttler via Twenty20.

It is a boring platitude that history has produced its share of intellectual folly. Jean Jacques Rousseau, for example, believed that humans are born a “blank slate” and only corrupted as they grow up in modern society, an assertion he could have known to be insane merely by paying a few hours of attention to the handful of children he fathered and sent off to the orphanage right after their birth. Karl Marx falls neatly into the same category: Born with a silver spoon in his mouth, he spent most of his life staring at books and had little actual…


@svetlaya, licensed from Twenty20.com

Yours truly finished reading two books last week, each of which rather instructive in its own way. The first is Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn’s three-volume The Gulag Archipelago. In this world-famous, monumental work published in 1973, the author offers a horrifying look into life in the Soviet prison camps. Contrary to popular opinion at the time, Solzhenitsyn traced the gulags origins all the way back to Lenin and argued that they were inherent to the Soviet political system. This came as a shock to gullible Western intellectuals who excused the existence of the camps as a mere deviation under Stalin.

The other…

Mark Alexis

Business owner in the United States. Formerly Dutch. Blogs about politics, culture and philosophy at FreeDutchman.com.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store